Hidden Through Time
Gameplay 8
Graphics 8
Sound 8

Hidden Through Time is a charming little game that challenges you to locate a variety of small objects amongst levels full of hand-drawn characters and objects. The visuals are bright and colorful while the four different time periods ensure plenty of variety. Although the 26 levels included with the game can be completed in no time, Hidden Through Time also features a nice level editor and access to tons of user-generated content to increase its longevity.

Gameplay: Very easy to pick up and play, but it’s also very easy to get hooked.

Graphics: The visuals are quite charming and are packed with some nice detail.

Sound: Nothing spectacular, but fits the theme of the game

Summary 8.0 Great
Gameplay 0
Graphics 0
Sound 0
Summary rating from user's marks. You can set own marks for this article - just click on stars above and press "Accept".
Accept
Summary 0.0 Terrible

Hidden Through Time

Developer: Crazy Monkey Studios | Publisher: Crazy Monkey Studios | Release Date: 2020 | Genre: Casual / Hidden Object | Website: Official Website | Purchase: Steam

Ever since the Where’s Wally? (called Where’s Waldo ins some countries) books appeared on the scene people of all ages have had fun trying to spot the iconic character amidst detailed illustrations. However, there have been surprisingly few games that have attempted to recreate this formula. The only real standout title that springs to mind, apart from the officially licensed titles, is the 2017 release Hidden Folks. It has taken quite a while, but finally, a new challenger has emerged in the form of Hidden Through Time by Crazy Monkey Studios.

Hidden Through Time challenges players to locate a series of small objects amongst the clutter of large levels full of hand-drawn people and objects. As the name suggests the game is split into four different time periods, so levels start out with a stone-age theme before moving on to ancient Egypt, the medieval ages and finally the Western era. In total there are 26 different levels for players to work through and while they start out very easy, it’s not long before they are not just bigger, but also have more items that need to be found. Unless explicitly choosing this setting in the options menu players do not have to find every item on a level to progress to the next one. Instead, new levels unlock once specific milestones are reached, which means if you do well on early levels you could unlock two or even three new ones to try out for when you eventually do become stuck.

Within the four themes based on the time periods that we mentioned earlier the levels also all have their own unique settings. For example, the stone age levels have a T-Rex Attack and Rock Expo while there’s a Jousting Tournament amongst the medieval levels and a Gold Rush level for the Western era. This ensures that the game has plenty of variety and interesting levels for players to search with a fine tooth-comb. The levels themselves are bright and colorful with the art style looking like something straight out of a children’s book. The little characters with their stick-figure arms and legs look quite charming and the levels have just enough animations to keep things lively. Levels are viewed from an overhead isometric perspective and you can move around the screen for larger maps as well as zoom in to find those tiny items like knives, bananas or snails.

All of the items that you have to find on the level are displayed at the bottom of the screen and if you are stumped you can hover your mouse over their images for a cryptic clue of their whereabouts. Most of the items are pretty easy to find, but some of the smaller ones are hidden quite well. The game doesn’t feature a ton of interaction when it comes to clicking on things, but you can peek inside buildings to see what they are hiding. It’s a pity that as neat as the visuals are they are not really hiding that many funny secrets or scenes like the Waldo books that had seemingly endless easter eggs to discover. When it comes to visual options, Hidden Through Time allows players to select the resolution of the game, set it to full-screen mode, allow it to run in the background and enable or disable Vsync.

It doesn’t take very long to complete all 26 levels on offer, but you can reset your progress for either the selected map or all maps if you feel like playing through the game again. However, what really sets the game apart from the competition is the inclusion of a level editor. It is this that allows you to not only create your own levels but also connect online to play levels created by other players. Theoretically, this means unlimited new levels, but as with all games that allow user-generated content you are going to find plenty of bad with the good. Thankfully, Hidden Through Time allows you to sort through the online maps by like percentage, most played, most cleared, clear percentage, most recent and oldest. It also keeps track of levels that you have already played and you can rate levels as well as mark your favorites. We found some really nice levels created by other players, but there were also a few that simply consisted of a blank screen with the items that needed to be found plonked down in plain sight. Seeing as some of the Steam achievements require players to complete a certain amount of online maps it was inevitable that suck low effort attempts would pop up to ease the grind.

Creating your own levels is as easy as clicking and dragging as all the objects at your disposal are arranged into categories. All the objects in your selected category are then displayed at the bottom of the screen and can then be dragged to where you want them. You also have access to basic tools like flipping and duplicating objects along with an undo and redo feature. Overall, it’s a very simple editor, but very easy to use and with a little time and effort you can come up with some nice maps. Of course, you are still limited to the four time periods along with their objects, but at least you can mix and match them for some unique levels.

The audio in Hidden Through Time is pretty mellow and while the number of music tracks feels a little on the low side they never became annoying. You can, however, enable or disable the sound, ambient sound and music or adjust the sound levels for each independently. We have no problems with the user interface either and everything can quickly and easily be accessed with just a few mouse clicks.

All in all, we had fun with Hidden Through Time and although it didn’t take very long to discover everything on every level there’s still plenty of user content to work through. The fact that the game has no timers or click limits makes it a very relaxing experience and it is also a family-friendly title that can be enjoyed by players of all ages. Experienced players may find it a little on the easy side, but once again there is plenty of very difficult user-created levels to take on. If you are looking for something that will help you to unwind without requiring a major investment in time or brainpower, then Hidden Through Time comes highly recommended.

System Requirements

  • Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
  • OS: Windows 7 or later
  • Processor: Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Geforce GT 430 (1024 MB) / Radeon HD 5570 (1024 MB)
  • DirectX: Version 9.0
  • Storage: 500 MB available space
  • Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
  • OS: Mac OS X 10.11 (El Capitan) or later
  • Processor: Intel Core i5-4570 (4 * 3200)
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: GeForce GT 755M
  • Storage: 500 MB available space
  • Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system

Related posts

Solstice Chronicles: MIA

Solstice Chronicles: MIA

Solstice Chronicles: MIA is a twin stick shooter where the odds are very much against you. Faced with waves of deadly enemies, your only chance for survival is to play a bit more tactical than what is expected from you in most of these types of games. Using your drone companion to manage your threat level is essential and sometimes knowing when to make a run for it is just as useful as standing your ground. With four character classes, different skill trees, a story mode and survival mode, this is the type of game that can keep you busy for ages. The lack of online co-op sucks, but nothing beats setting up two controllers and playing with a friend next to you on the couch. Gameplay: The game is intense,even on lower skill levels, and requires you to do more than just spray and pray. Graphics: Not a very colorful game, but the top down visuals packs plenty of detail. Sound: Surprisingly good voice acting even if the background music is nothing to write home about.

Pulstar

Pulstar

Pulstar is a very straightforward arcade shooter so depending on your taste you will either find it a refreshing blast from the past or become frustrated after only a few minutes. It definitely packs quite a challenge and the difficulty ramps up very quickly, so quick reflexes and a bit of luck is required to make the most of it. If you enjoyed games like Geometry Wars and Beat Hazard you will have fun with Pulstar. Gameplay: Straightforward and challenging arcade shooter. Graphics: Nice, but it can be hard to distinguish the enemies from the background at times. Sound: The sound effects lack punch, but the music is very catchy.

Alan Wake’s American Nightmare

Alan Wake's American Nightmare

American Nightmare offers more action and less atmosphere than the original game, but it is still a compelling addition to the series. With only three locations to explore it lacks the depth of the first game, but the story is still very interesting. It is important to remember that this is not a sequel, but a bite sized addition to the Alan Wake saga. Gameplay: A more action oriented approach than the original game. Graphics: Good but the wide open areas makes it less creepy. Sound: Overall good, but some of the voice acting could have been better.

Crimsonland

Crimsonland

If you played Crimsonland before, the updated version is definitely a nostalgic blast from the past. It still has enough to offer new players as well with a multitude of modes, weapons, perks and achievements to keep things interesting. As long as you don't expect a deep plot or anything beyond killing every monster in sight you will have fun with Crimsonland. Gameplay: A simple, yet addictive top down shooter which is enhanced with some great perks. Graphics: Improved over the original version, but still pretty basic. Sound: Suits the game nicely, but doesn't really stand out.

Contrast

Contrast

The visual style is what drew me to Contrast but the clever puzzles and wonderful atmosphere is what kept me playing. Each new location was genuinely interesting to explore and the concept of switching between 3D and 2D planes mean you have to think out of the box sometimes. The latest patch fixed most of the launch issues and the result is an entertaining and memorable experience. Gameplay: Switching between 3D and 2D to solve puzzles is a unique and interesting twist. Graphics: The locations are larger than life and very memorable. Sound: Great voice acting and a stellar soundtrack.

Metrocide

Metrocide

There’s no denying that Metrocide is a very hard and frequently frustrating game. Spend enough time with it though and you’ll learn to appreciate the punishing difficulty level. Your first few kills might be sloppy and chaotic, but with practice you’ll be able to take down your marks with precision and stealth. It takes a lot of patience and dedication to get anywhere in this game, but it is quite satisfying when you pull off the perfect kill. Just be aware that the game can become repetitive. Gameplay: If one hit kills and permadeaths are not your thing then neither will Metrocide. Graphics: The 8-bit aesthetic takes a while to get used to, but the visuals are not without their charm. Sound: No real soundtrack, but the ambient audio is very atmospheric.

Leave a comment

11 + fifteen =