Tasty Blue
Gameplay 8
Graphics 7
Sound 6

Tasty Blue features a very simple idea, but it is done quite well. The amount of difficulty settings makes it a game that can be enjoyed by player of all ages and skill levels. Although it can get repetitive after a while the humor and sheer amount of carnage that you can get up to definitely make it worth a second look. It is also a great game for playing a level or two when you don’t feel like firing up something a bit more demanding or involved.

Gameplay: Simple and repetitive, but quite addictive and entertaining.

Graphics: The 2D visuals are charming and colorful, but rather basic.

Sound: The tunes are nice at first, but there are too few of them and they start to become annoying

Summary 7.0 Good
Gameplay 0
Graphics 0
Sound 0
Summary rating from user's marks. You can set own marks for this article - just click on stars above and press "Accept".
Accept
Summary 0.0 Terrible

Tasty Blue

Developer: Dingo Games | Publisher: Dingo Games | Release Date: 2015 | Genre: Action / Adventure / Casual / Indie | Website: Official Website | Format: Digital Download

Seeing as the “underwater side-scrolling eat ‘em up” genre, as Dingo Games classify Tasty Blue, is rather underrepresented on this site we had no choice but to take a look. The game opens with a pet shop owner warning a customer not to overfeed their goldfish, but alas they disregard his advice. After gobbling up all the food, the tiny goldfish escapes to the ocean where it continues its feeding frenzy. The more it eats the larger it grows until nothing is safe from its slavering jaws.

After playing Tasty Blue for a while the game really reminded me of the old arcade classic, Rampage. Swimming around the ocean gorging on everything in sight has that same feeling of mindless mayhem that Rampage had. You can simply switch off your brain, sit back and cause some carnage. In addition to the goldfish, the game also stars a Dolphin that is tired of jumping through flaming hoops at the aquarium, and a nano-shark, designed to track down and eliminate the other two aquatic menaces.

Tasty Blue provides players with 50 story mode missions, which can be tackled alone or with a friend, where the goal is simply to eat everything smaller than yourself. As your fish feeds it grows bigger and is able to devour larger things. Depending on the difficulty level you select, the bigger creatures range from barely being able to touch you, to swimming deathtraps that can turn the tables on your fish and eat it. Each level is timed and you earn a star rating depending on how quickly you were able to consume everything.

The premise of the game is hardly rocket science, so it is no surprise that the developers have opted for a rather humorous approach. You might start off eating small fish, but soon you’ll be able to leap out of the ocean to snatch birds out of the air and even grow large enough to eat boats, helicopters or planes! Watching a giant gold fish munching sperm whales, giant sea squids and nuclear submarines is a surreal sight to say the least. Although very entertaining you are pretty much doing the same thing on each level and it is simply the scale that differs. This means that the game can get rather repetitive, especially if you play for long sessions. The multi-player mode helps to keep things interesting as you can team up with a friend for some local co-op in horizontal or vertical split screen mode or using a shared screen. After completing the story missions you also gain access to 15 bonus missions. These provide a little more variety than the story missions as you might be required to swim through a Pac-man style maze eating mines while getting chased by sharks or even chase down and eat a super-fast Loch Ness monster.

Although the simple 2D visuals of Tasty Blue are not going to win any awards, they are quite charming in their own way. The animations are a little stiff, but everything is bright and colorful. The game only has three different environments, which is temperate, arctic and tropical, but the amount of things that you can eat is quite impressive. For added comical value you can also toggle the amount of blood via a “carnage” slider. The blood is off by default though and without it the game is quite suitable for players of all ages as the violence is comical and not realistic.

The tunes in the game are quite catchy, but very limited, so if you play for a while you are going to hear the same songs over and over again. The first couple of times you hear the music it will put a smile on your face, but the songs start to grate after a while. The sound effects consist mostly of munching and whatever sound effect the creatures you are eating make. The game can be controlled with a keyboard, mouse or controller and maneuvering your character around is easy enough with any of these. Things are eaten automatically if your character is big enough by simply moving close to them, so the only button you have to worry about is the one you hold down to gain a speed boost. This is handy for evading the bigger predators or for building up the speed to leap out of the water and bite something mid-air.

Tasty Blue might not be much more than mindless entertainment, but thanks to its wallet friendly price and low system requirements it definitely offers value for money. It might not keep you busy for more than a couple of hours, but how many other games allow you to eat aircraft carriers with a goldfish?

System Requirements

  • OS: Windows XP
  • Processor: 1.4 GHz
  • Memory: 512 MB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 7.0
  • Hard Drive: 30 MB available space
  • OS: 10.6
  • Processor: 1.4 GHz
  • Memory: 512 MB RAM
  • Hard Drive: 30 MB available space

Related posts

The Secret Order 2: Masked Intent

The Secret Order 2: Masked Intent

The Secret Order 2: Masked Intent is a hidden object game that doesn’t just confine itself to one theme, or even time period. Instead, you’ll be visiting a variety of locations, spread across the ages as you attempt to thwart a member of the secret order who has gone rogue. It is a good looking game, with plenty of detail and while there is nothing here we haven’t seen before in the genre, it still kept us engaged and entertained. Gameplay: Plenty of hidden object scenes as well as puzzles to solve. Graphics: The locations are nice and varied and the visuals are quite detailed. Sound: The soundtrack is quite moody and atmospheric.

Eventide: Slavic Fable

Eventide: Slavic Fable

Unlike other hidden object games that are fond of featuring the usual supernatural suspects like ghosts, Eventide contains plenty of creatures from Slavic fables. Their inclusion, along with the colorful hand drawn visuals, provide the game with a unique look and feel. The story is still a bit clichéd and the game isn’t very long, but it is a lot of fun while it lasts. This makes it a good choice for newcomers to the genre, but the charming visuals and interesting locations will appeal to veterans as well. Gameplay: Definitely an easy title, but also a lot of fun while it lasts. Graphics: Vibrant, colorful visuals and some very cool creature designs. Sound: The voice acting could have been better in spots, but overall the audio is good.

Super Comboman

Super Comboman

Super Comboman contains some great ideas, but is let down by less than stellar gameplay. Games such as Guacamelee! and Aces Wild have already demonstrated how great titles in the platform brawling genre can be, but Super Comboman doesn't quite live up to expectations. The controls are the biggest source of frustration and the steep difficulty curve also feels more like a punishment than a challenge. Gameplay: Lots of potential, but let down by frustrating controls and a steep difficulty curve. Graphics: The sticker style visuals is an interesting and unique choice. Sound: Not bad, but a little repetitive.

Vector

Vector

Vector allows you to experience the thrill of being chased and pulling off some wicked parkour moves without the need to memorize millions of button combinations. Things start off very simple, but the difficulty ramps up quickly and perfecting the levels require patience and practice. This is definitely a game that offers a lot at and at a very reasonable price. Gameplay: Easy to play but very challenging to master. Graphics: The game looks good in high resolution, but the animations steal the show. Sound: The audio is good for getting the adrenaline flowing.

Beat Da Beat

Beat Da Beat

Blast away aliens that move and attack to the beat of some great Dubstep tracks in this addictive bullet hell shooter. The game is no walk in the park and with four difficulty settings as well as ten ships to unlock it will keep you busy for a while. Being a fan of EDM obviously helps, but the charming pixel art style visuals and relentless action is what kept us coming back for more. Gameplay: As simple as dodging bullets and grabbing coins. Graphics: Retina searing colors and flashes, but very nice overall. Sound: Your personal music taste will determine whether you like the Dubstep soundtrack or not.

Home is Where One Starts

Home is Where One Starts

Help a young girl explore the lonely countryside around her childhood home when she misses her bus to school. Although very short, Home Is Where One Starts is a captivating experience with excellent narration and interesting environments. The short length along with the absence of puzzles or action means it won’t appeal to everyone, but players who enjoy more relaxing titles like Gone Home or Dear Esther will feel right at home. Gameplay: The walking speed of the protagonist is a little slow and the gameworld small, but exploring it is interesting. Graphics: The visuals are quite beautiful, but some objects lack detail when viewed up close. Sound: The soundtrack is excellent and the voice acting superb.

Leave a comment

3 × 4 =