Dusty Revenge:Co-Op Edition
Gameplay 8
Graphics 8
Sound 8

Don’t let the cartoon style visuals fool you, Dusty Revenge is a brutal and violent game. It is also a very playable game with satisfying combat where you can pull off plenty of combo attacks. The game feels all lot like classic side scrolling beat ’em ups like TMNT and Streets of Rage. The co-op mode also adds to the fun, although sadly it is local only.

Gameplay: Traditional side scrolling beat ’em up.

Graphics: Beautiful backgrounds and unique character designs.

Sound: Fitting music and solid sound effects

Summary 8.0 Great
Gameplay 0
Graphics 0
Sound 0
Summary rating from user's marks. You can set own marks for this article - just click on stars above and press "Accept".
Accept
Summary 0.0 Terrible

Dusty Revenge:Co-Op Edition

Developer: PD Design Studio | Publisher: PD Design Studio | Release Date: 2014 | Genre: Action / Indie / Side Scrolling Beat ‘Em Up | Website: Official Website | Purchase: Steam

When Dusty returns home to find his house in flames and his wife Daisy murdered, he immediately seeks revenge. Teaming up with an artillery expert named Rondel and a sharpshooter called McCoy, Dusty sets out to track down whoever is responsible for wronging him. It is also probably worth mentioning that Dusty is a bunny, Rondel a bear and McCoy a hound.

Dusty might be a lagomorph, but don’t let his fluffy appearance and long ears fool you. He is armed to the teeth and not afraid to resort to violence. Dusty Revenge is a side scrolling beat ’em up which throws all manner of anthropomorphic foes at you across ten hand drawn environments. There are some light platforming sprinkled in as well, but levels are fairly linear and the focus is firmly on the combat.

The most striking thing about the game is the visuals. The hand drawn backgrounds look amazing and are packed with detail. The game has a sort of Wild West steam punk flavor that gives it a unique flair. Enemies consist of moles, rats, hippos, cats, frogs, weasels and more, each with their own distinctive look and attack patterns. Some of the enemies like the hippo are huge and there are some pretty large bosses as well.

Dusty can use his fists for a light attack of whip out a giant scythe for slower but heavier attacks. He also packs a pair of pistols for long range attacks and a shotgun for armored foes. The pistols are rather weak, but have a good range while the shotgun is handy for blowing enemies off ledges. When the going gets tough Dusty can call in Rondel or McCoy to provide support. When you activate an ally, Dusty blocks while you take control of the support character. Rondel is armed with a mortar that can be aimed at groups of enemies or obstacles while McCoy has a sniper rifle which provides you with crosshairs for precision shooting. Your allies are not available at all times, and you have to recharge the support bar to make use of them, but they are a pretty nifty addition to the game.

The way Dusty fights immediately reminded us of Devil May Cry and the combat looks pretty spectacular. Beating up enemies provides you with experience, and you automatically unlock new moves when your character levels up. You can get pretty far just by mashing buttons, but taking the time to learn the combos will make you a more effective fighter. Besides fighting, Dusty can perform the standard jumps and double-jumps you would expect as well as use his freakishly long ears to float. A handy roll allows you to evade attacks or dodge some of the environmental hazards. The controls felt pretty solid, but definitely work better with a controller. There are some nice cut-scenes between levels that flesh out the story and the voice acting for these are pretty solid. With his raspy voice, Dusty definitely sounds like the type of rabbit that you would not want to mess with.

As the levels are fairly linear, there isn’t much scope for exploration. You can’t really backtrack although there are some secrets hidden throughout the levels. Rondel can be used to blow up floors that might reveal unlockable artwork or treasure chests used to upgrade your health, support or special meters. At the end of each level you are rated on the time it took you to complete the stage as well as how many secrets and treasure chests you found. The game felt a bit longer than what is average for the genre, and upon completion a boss rush mode is unlocked.

As the name implies, Dusty Revenge: Co-Op Edition adds a second playable character, Kitsune, to the mix. You can team up with another player to take on the game or choose between Dusty and Kitsune when playing solo. Unfortunately, the co-op mode is local only so if your friends are further away than your coach you are out of luck.

Upon initial release, there were some performance issues with the game, but the version used for the review ran without a hitch. We didn’t’ encounter any crashes or errors and managed to complete the game with no problems. About the only issue worth mentioning is the loading times which felt a bit longer than expected. The game has selectable difficulty settings so anyone should be able to make it to the end. The unlockable artwork and costumes also provide some incentive for replaying levels. The boss rush mode, which pits you against all the bosses in the game in succession, also provides a stiff challenge.

If you can live with the fact that there is no online mode, Dusty Revenge: Co-Op Edition is a colorful and very entertaining title. The 2D visuals are very detailed and the whole look of the game is quite imaginative. A pair of controllers and a co-op partner is recommended if you want to get the most out of the game, but even solo players will enjoy what is on offer.

* This review is based on Dusty Revenge: Co-Op Edition Release version 2.0.3741

System Requirements

  • OS: Win XP, Vista, 7, 8
  • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Discrete Graphics Card with 512mb, OpenGL 2.0
  • DirectX: Version 9.0c
  • Hard Drive: 3000 MB available space
  • Sound Card: Open AL
  • Additional Notes: Not recommended for play on Intel systems with integrated/shared video memory
  • OS: Win XP, Vista, 7, 8
  • Processor: Mid Range Intel Core 2 Duo
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Mid Range Discrete Graphics Card with 512mb, OpenGL 2.0
  • DirectX: Version 9.0c
  • Hard Drive: 3000 MB available space
  • Sound Card: Open AL
  • Additional Notes: Not recommended for play on Intel systems with integrated/shared video memory
  • OS: 10.6.8 and above
  • Processor: Core 2 Duo
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Discrete Graphics Card with 512mb, OpenGL 2.0
  • Hard Drive: 3000 MB available space
  • Sound Card: Open AL
  • Additional Notes: Not recommended for play on Intel systems with integrated/shared video memory
  • OS: 10.6.8 and above
  • Processor: Core 2 Duo
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Discrete Graphics Card with 512mb, OpenGL 2.0
  • Hard Drive: 3000 MB available space
  • Sound Card: Open AL
  • Additional Notes: Not recommended for play on Intel systems with integrated/shared video memory

Related posts

Mythic Wonders: The Philosopher’s Stone

Mythic Wonders: The Philosopher's Stone

Join Emma as she searches for her missing uncle in a couple of elemental based realms while outwitting the guardian that is intent on stopping her. Mythic Wonders: The Philosopher’s Stone features great visuals and entertaining puzzles as well as decent hidden object scenes that make up for the rather generic storyline. Thanks to the robust customization options it is also an adventure that can be enjoyed no matter what your skill level is. Gameplay: The puzzles are enjoyable and the hidden object scenes well done. Graphics: Beautiful hand drawn visuals that show a lot of imagination. Sound: The soundtrack is quite enjoyable, but the voice acting is average at best.

Tales of Aravorn: Seasons Of The Wolf

Tales of Aravorn: Seasons Of The Wolf

Seasons of the Wolf strays even further from the visual novel path than Loren the Amazon Princess did and feels like a full-fledged role playing game. It still has great characters and an engrossing story, but you’ll be spending more time doing quests and less time romancing party members. Cranking up the difficulty setting also provides a much bigger challenge this time round. Since this game is not a sequel to Loren and only set in the same fantasy world you don’t need any prior knowledge to jump in and enjoy it. Don’t take our word for it though, check out the demo for yourself. Gameplay: The game is more of a role playing title than a visual novel, but remains very engrossing. Graphics: Beautiful artwork, varied locations and great character designs. Sound: No speech, but some good music.

Grand Theft Auto IV

Grand Theft Auto IV

Its hard not to harbor some resentment for the delay and lesser port that PC owners have received with this game, but at the end of the day it's still a lot of fun to play and a great game. As long as you can look past the technical issues that is. Gameplay: The technical issues and more "mature" feel detracts a bit from the gameplay but it's still good. Graphics: With the right hardware this game looks stunning. Sound: Decent voice acting and loads of good tunes.

Empathy: Path of Whispers

Empathy: Path of Whispers

Empathy: Path of Whispers might look like a typical walking simulator, but it isn’t afraid to test the boundaries of the genre. The surreal gameworld isn’t just pretty to look at, but also offers players more freedom to explore than similar titles. It is up to players to piece together the fragmented story by finding and listening to the memories of the missing people who once inhabited the lonely landscapes. This means that some players will love the act of tracking down all the memories and connecting the clues while others will find it needlessly repetitive and obtuse. Gameplay: A mixture of exploration, listening to audio memories, solving minor puzzles and unraveling the story. Graphics: The surreal landscapes look great from a distance, but loses some splendor when viewed up close. Sound: The soundtrack is good and the game features a large cast of diverse character voices.

Eventide 3: Legacy of Legends

Eventide 3: Legacy of Legends

Mary the botanist is back and this time it is her brother that is in need of rescuing. This means another adventure through exotic locations while encountering interesting creatures from Slavic mythology. Like previous titles in the series, Eventide 3 isn’t the longest or most challenging example of the genre, but makes up for it with its unique setting. Newcomers to the genre will get the most out of this game as it features quite a few minigames that are very familiar to veterans, but makes up for it with some nice hidden object scenes. The lush visuals and imaginative scenes also set this game apart from other titles. If you are a fan of the genre and want a relaxing adventure that will keep you busy for an evening or two, then Eventide 3 should be high on your wishlist. Gameplay: Not that challenging and the minigames could have benefited from some more originality, but the hidden object scenes are good. Graphics: The series has a reputation for great visuals and Eventide 3 doesn’t disappoint in this regard. Sound: Decent voice acting and some nice tunes.

The Marvellous Miss Take

The Marvellous Miss Take

You might be playing as a trio of thieves in The Marvellous Miss Take, but don’t expect shadowy corners and stealth kills. Instead, the game challenges you to get the job done as quickly as possible and without being able to resort to any violent means. A nice selection of gadgets offer some help, but the random guard patrols, abundance of security cameras, and dogs that can track your sent means even the best plans can quickly go awry. It is a challenging title, so expect to spend some time if you want to fully conquer all its missions. Gameplay: With a lot more action than stealth this game will appeal to players that don’t have the patience to lurk in the shadows while memorizing guard patterns. Graphics: Colorful, well animated and very charming. Sound: No voice acting, but the soundtrack fits the action very nicely.

Leave a comment

11 − ten =