Fallout 3 – Point Lookout
Gameplay 8
Graphics 8
Sound 8

The spooky swamps of Point Lookout are a welcome break from the dusty wasteland. Infested with mutated hillbillies and crazy cultists there is lots of interesting locations to explore. It is a little lacking in good loot, but the story and location hold up well.

Gameplay: Less linear than previous DLC and a lot creepier.

Graphics: A new location and a few new enemies.

Sound: Still good

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Fallout 3 – Point Lookout

Developer: Bethesda Game Studios | Publisher: Bethesda Softworks | Release Date: 2010 | Genre: RPG / DLC | Website: N/A | Purchase: Steam

There is no distress signal luring you to the Point Lookout quest as in previous Fallout 3 DLC. Instead you are informed that a ferryman is offering boat trips up the Potomac River for adventurers seeking treasure and fortune.  You can start the trip any time that you can afford the crossing fee and once you leave the Capital Wasteland behind you are greeted by a spooky, swampy slice of Southern hell.

The Point Lookout area might have escaped the brunt of the nuclear bombs, but it definitely did not avoid the radioactive fallout. Inbred hillbilly locals roam the swamps in search of their next meal while crazy tribal cult members will happily slaughter you in the name of peace. Throw in some Swamplurks which look like the DC comics’ character, Swamp Thing and you have yourself a formidable range of new foes.

When you first step foot off the boat you are greeted with the sight of an abandoned amusement park, complete with a large dilapidated Ferris wheel. This eerie sight invoked memories of Pripyat, but a dark plume of smoke emanating from a nearby mansion clear draws the attention to where you can start the main quest. This DLC is a lot less linear than previous Fallout 3 offerings, however, so you are pretty free to just wander off into the swamps and do your own thing. You’ll find locals that need help with brewing moonshine, complete a Chinese spy mission that was interrupted by the fall of the bombs and meet creepy characters such as Obidiah Blackwater.

The map that you explore is rather large and while obviously not the size of the Capitol Wasteland there are still plenty of interesting locations, such as a lighthouse, ancient submarine and more to find. It’s mostly swamps and shacks with the odd crash site, but scouting out everything rewards you with an achievement. There are some new weapons such as the double-barreled shotgun and a shovel of all thing, but don’t’ expect the type of nifty weapons or armor that was your reward in previous DLC. The new punga fruits serve as a healthier substitute for Nuka Cola as these new consumables can restore both health and drop radiation levels.

Point Lookout has quite a creepy atmosphere and the powerful enemies will keep you on your toes no matter what your level is. The game retains its twisted sense of humor as well with scenarios such as helping a ghoul defend his mansion from a mindless human attack or infiltrating a crazed cult and ending up losing… well you’ll see.

This penultimate bit of Fallout 3 DLC is definitely one of the best and I found it interesting enough to uncover every nook and cranny. If you just plan on blitzing through the main quest before hopping back on the ferry you are robbing yourself of some very cool side-quests. Take your time and explore the swamps of Point Lookout. You never know what you might find out there in the wild.

*Review originally published 2010.

System Requirements

  • Operating system: Windows XP/Vista
  • Processor: 2.4 Ghz Intel Pentium 4 or equivalent processor
  • Memory: 1 GB (XP)/ 2 GB (Vista)
  • Hard disk space: 7 GB
  • Video: Direct X 9.0c compliant video card with 256MB RAM (NVIDIA 6800 or better/ATI X850 or better)
  • Sound: DirectX®: 9.0c
  • Controller support: Xbox 360 controller
  • Other Requirements: Online play requires log-in to Games For Windows – Live

Supported Video Card Chipsets:

  • NVIDIA GeForce 200 series, Geforce 9800 series, Geforce 9600 series, Geforce 8800 series, Geforce 8600 series, Geforce 8500 series, Geforce 8400 series, Geforce 7900 series, Geforce 7800 series, Geforce 7600 series, Geforce 7300 series, GeForce 6800 series
  • ATI HD 4800 series, HD 4600 series, HD 3800 series, HD 3600 series, HD 3400 series, HD 2900 series, HD 2600 series, HD 2400 series, X1900 series, X1800 series, X1600 series, X1300 series, X850 series
  • Operating system: Windows XP/Vista
  • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo processor
  • Memory: 2 GB System RAM
  • Hard disk space: 7 GB
  • Video: Direct X 9.0c compliant video card with 512MB RAM (NVIDIA 8800 series, ATI 3800 series)
  • Sound: DirectX®: 9.0c
  • Controller support: Xbox 360 controller

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