Goat Simulator
Gameplay 8
Graphics 8
Sound 8

Goat Simulator might be a joke, but that doesn’t mean that it isn’t a lot of fun. There is a surprising amount of things to do considering the small playing area and tons of secrets to discover. If you like messing around in a sandbox environment you will get your moneys’ worth out of this game, but it remains to be seen how much Steam Workshop content will be released to increase the longevity.

Gameplay: Buggy, glitchy and lots of fun while it lasts.

Graphics: Nice visuals, but intentionally bad animations.

Sound: Decent sound effects and one extremely catchy tune

Summary 8.0 Great
Gameplay 0
Graphics 0
Sound 0
Summary rating from user's marks. You can set own marks for this article - just click on stars above and press "Accept".
Accept
Summary 0.0 Terrible

Goat Simulator

Developer: Coffee Stain Studios | Publisher: Coffee Stain Studios | Release Date: 2014 | Genre: Casual / Indie / Simulation | Website: Official Website | Purchase: Steam

An indestructible goat terrorizing a small town might sound like a Stephen King novel, but it is actually the latest title from Coffee Stain Studios. Don’t let the simulator part of the title fool you, this game simulates goats in the same way that Surgeon Simulator 2013 simulated surgery.

No reason is given for the goat going berserk, but then again none is needed. You are simply plopped into a small town sandbox, with physics that barely hold everything together, and then encouraged to go on a rampage. Due to the unpredictable physics all kinds of wacky things happen while you are causing mayhem. Your goat has a super powered headbutt that can blow up cars with one hit and send non player characters soaring through the air like something out of a Japanese anime. The physics tend to spazz out all the time, so you never know if bumping into something will cause it, or your goat to go flying off the map. If this sounds stupid and broken to you, you would be absolutely right, but that is kind of the point of the game.

Goat Simulator was born from a game jam entry that garnered way more interest than the developers probably expected. Instead of spending years putting together a polished version of the game, the developers instead embraced the inevitable bugs and glitches that make the game as entertaining to watch as it is to play. They are eliminating the crash bugs, but in their own words “everything else is hilarious” and they are keeping it.

As you move your goat around the map in third person, you earn points for destroying things. Doing so with style earns you more points, but don’t expect too much depth. The scoring system has been compared to the old school skateboarding games like Tony Hawk’s, but it is a lot simpler than that. Your goat can do flips and spins while airborne, but that is about the extent of its “tricks.” You get a selection of challenges to complete, but these are pretty easy and can be done in an hour or two. The map is fairly detailed, but quite small, so most of your time will be occupied with seeing what kind of shenanigans your goat can get up to. Apart from headbutting things, you can also jump and lick. The lick is of particular interest as your goat has a very stretchy, very sticky tongue. Once the goat has latched on to something or someone with its tongue you can either drag it around or be dragged around. Your goat can also go limp at the touch of a button, which not only looks quite funny, but makes it more maneuverable as it is soaring through the air.

The longevity in Goat Simulator comes from the amount of secrets and easter eggs that are packed away in its small playing area. There are a few houses that you can enter, including a recreation of the Coffee Stains Studio, where you can play a few rounds of Flappy Goat while causing havoc. There are also hidden statues tucked away all over the map and obtaining these gives you access to some pretty funny alternatives to the default goat. I don’t want to spoil anything but the feather goat and tall goat alone makes it worth the effort of tracking down those golden statues. Other bizarre additions such as jetpacks, sacrificial clearings and even outer space add to the fun.

The visuals are surprisingly detailed, although the same can’t be said about the animations. The town is inhabited by some humans, but they generally just stand or dance around until directly threatened by the goat. The ragdoll physics for both the humans and goat result in some pretty weird contortions, and the way that the goat climbs ladders with its head rotating around looks downright disturbing. The sound effects are limited to some screams, explosions and your goat baaaa-ing, which is important enough to have its own key. The audio consists of one annoyingly catching tune that fits the game perfectly.

Goat Simulator is ultimately a joke, released on the 1st of April no less, so sooner or later it starts to wear thin. Don’t get me wrong, I spend about six hours just messing around and exploring the limits of the sandbox, but eventually you run out of things to do. The game is definitely more enjoyable when played with a group, and I have had a few people that scoffed at the idea of a goat game only to become totally engrossed in the onscreen antics. While what is on offer is already worth the asking price, the longevity is going to come from the Steam Workshop support that the game features. At the moment there is only a handful of items available, but considering the popularity of the game this is sure to change.

If you buy Goat Simulator at its full price you have no right to complain about any limitations. The developers themselves have stated that you might be better off saving up your money for a real goat, so you can’t say that you haven’t been warned. Ultimately though, the game is a lot of fun and I can think of far worse ways to spend my time than rampaging around as a virtual goat.

*Review originally published 2014.

System Requirements

  • OS: Windows Vista
  • Processor: 2.0 GHz Dual Core Processor
  • Memory: 2 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Shader Model 3.0, 256 MB VRAM
  • DirectX: Version 9.0c
  • Storage: 2 GB available space
  • Sound Card: DirectX 9.0c-compatible, 16-bit
  • OS: Windows 7 or 8
  • Processor: 2.0 GHz Quad Core Processor
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Shader Model 3.0, 512 MB VRAM
  • DirectX: Version 9.0c
  • Storage: 2 GB available space
  • Sound Card: DirectX 9.0c-compatible, 16-bit
  • OS: OS X 10.7
  • Processor: 1,4 GHz Intel i5, 2.0 GHz Dual Core
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 4000
  • Storage: 2 GB available space
  • Additional Notes: MacBook Pro 2011, iMac 2011, MacBook Air 2012
  • OS: OS X 10.8
  • Processor: 2 GHz Intel i5 Processor
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5000
  • Storage: 2 GB available space
  • Additional Notes: 2013 models or better
  • OS: Ubuntu 12.04 LTS
  • Processor: 2.0 GHz Dual Core Processor
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Shader Model 3.0, 256 MB VRAM
  • Storage: 2 GB available space
  • Additional Notes: We recommend using proprietary NVIDIA/AMD drivers
  • OS: Ubuntu 12.04 LTS
  • Processor: 2.0 GHz Quad Core Processor
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Shader Model 3.0, 512 MB VRAM
  • Storage: 2 GB available space
  • Additional Notes: We recommend using proprietary NVIDIA/AMD drivers

Related posts

Batman: Arkham Asylum Game of the Year Edition

Batman: Arkham Asylum Game of the Year Edition

Batman: Arkham Asylum is as close to perfection as I have ever seen a game based upon a comic license come. Rocksteady Studios have come out of nowhere and released the definitive Batman game. Fans of the caped crusader will love this game but even if you only have a passing interest in the character you will find a lot to enjoy here. This game of the year edition adds a few extras to an already great game. Gameplay: Polished and engaging, this is the best Batman game yet. Graphics: Excellent visual style that retains the gritty look of the comic books. Sound: Excellent voice overs all round and great music.

RefRain -prism memories-

RefRain -prism memories-

RefRain is a great shooter that strays a little from the usual formula to offer an action packed experience that is based more on skill than luck. Mastering the use of the M.E.F.A2 and Concept Reactor attacks are immensely satisfying and also allows you to play more aggressively. Players used to power-ups and weapon upgrades will find that RefRain has a bit of a learning curve, but this also provides it with more longevity and replay value. Overall, if you are a fan of the genre, then RefRain certainly doesn’t disappoint. Gameplay: Challenging, but very rewarding when mastered. Graphics: The designs are a little bland compared to other shooters, but the game is very colorful. Sound: Features a very fitting electronic soundtrack.

Master Reboot

Master Reboot

I did not know what to expect when I entered the world of Master Reboot and the game delighted in surprising me around every turn. The way that the gameplay shifts depending on what memories you are reliving makes for a memorable experience and the creepy atmosphere will keep you on the edge of your seat. If you want to experience a game that is quite unlike anything else, do yourself a favor and check out Master Reboot. Gameplay: Each memory offers new surprises and ways to play. Graphics: The art style is very unique and features some breathtaking environments. Sound: The audio compliments the atmosphere of the game nicely.

Pinball FX3

Pinball FX3

Pinball FX 3 is not just a small update compared to Pinball FX 2, but feels like a brand new game. It comes with a range of new features that are aimed at drawing in newcomers as well as keeping veterans busy for longer. Not only does the older tables look better than ever before, but the brand new challenges and cross-platform features provide added incentives to return to them. It is a pity that not all the Pinball FX 2 tables could make the transition to the new game, it is a relief that the majority can be imported to the new game without having to pay for them again. Pinball FX 3 is without a doubt one of the best pinball games available on the market and definitely doesn’t disappoint if you are a fan of the genre. Gameplay: Plenty of new features that make it worth moving over from Pinball FX 2. Graphics: Thanks to real-time lighting and shadow projection the tables look better than ever. Sound: The guide can become a little annoying, but fortunately the game features plenty of audio options to customize your experience.

Prince of Persia®: The Sands of Time

Prince of Persia®: The Sands of Time

Definitely one of the most engrossing, entertaining and action packed games I've played in a long time. Despite some minor flaws, this game is essential to any good game collection. Gameplay: A bit slow paced & frustrating at times but has it's moments. Graphics: Not outstanding but for the genre it's not too shabby. Sound: Decent voice overs and nice music.

West of Loathing

West of Loathing

West of Loathing is a single player role playing game that doesn’t take itself too seriously, which results in a wild quest through the west. The world in which the game is set might be made up out of stick figures, but this doesn’t mean that it isn’t fleshed out. There are tons of locations to explore, plenty of puzzles to solve and hordes of enemies to defeat. Even better, it is the type of RPG where stats actually make a difference and your choices make a difference. Fans of the genre will love the amount of depth that the game has, but everyone else will appreciate the brilliant sense of humor. Gameplay: Packed with plenty to see and do, along with a healthy dose of humor. Graphics: The black and white stick figure style visuals might look simple at first, but definitely has a lot of charm Sound: Although the game doesn’t feature any voice acting, it has a great soundtrack and plenty of sound effects.

Leave a comment

5 × two =