Klonoa: Door to Phantomile
Graphics 7
Sound 7
Gameplay 7

If you enjoy platform games, then Klonoa has a lot to offer. The 2.5D visuals sets the game apart from the 3D titles of the era and there are lots of extra stuff to see and do while playing.

Gameplay: Pretty straightforward platform fare.

Graphics: A bit pixelated, but bright and colorful.

Sound: Upbeat

Summary 7.0 Good
Graphics 0
Sound 0
Gameplay 0
Summary rating from user's marks. You can set own marks for this article - just click on stars above and press "Accept".
Accept
Summary 0.0 Terrible

Klonoa: Door to Phantomile

Developer: Namco | Publisher: SCEE | Release Date: 1997 | Genre: Action / Platformer | Website: Official Website (Japanese) | Purchase: Amazon

Klonoa is a strange catlike creature who, along with his childhood friend Huepow (who is a ring spirit by the way), live in a world called Phantomile. The strange thing about this world is that it is fueled by the dreams of its inhabitants and thus they can’t remember any of their dreams. When Klonoa wakes up remembering one of his dreams he knows something is amiss and things get even stranger when his dream of a spaceship crashing into a nearby mountain comes true. Of course Klonoa and Huepow sets off to investigate this strange occurrence. The story might sound childish but it is quite imaginative and the ending came as a big shock to a lot of players.

Gameplay wise Klonoa is a straightforward platform game that will appeal to all Mario and Sonic fans. Klonoa can jump and hover for a short while using his floppy ears, but its his wind attack that is the most useful. Enemies can be captured with it and then used for a variety of purposes ranging from throwing them at other enemies to using them to jump to higher platforms. The gameplay is actually very puzzle oriented so don’t expect to just rush through the levels. Enemies require different techniques to dispose of them  and along the way you’ll also need to find the keys  that will unlock doors or manipulate the scenery in order to find a way through. There’s also a few interesting boss fights along the way.

Level layouts are pretty good and rarely straightforward. The “2.5D” nature of the graphics occasionally causes some parts to be obscured by objects in the foreground but nothing too serious. The graphics can also look a bit pixelated at times, but remain bright and colorful throughout. The bouncy, upbeat music fits the game nicely and while there’s no speech the characters all speak with gibberish voices while the translation is given in text format.

Klonoa has a bit of backtracking at times and it s possible to take repeated hits, which is very annoying but overall the game isn’t too difficult. You can save at the end of each level and there are lots of checkpoints, but lose all your lives and its right back to the start. Just playing the game to finish it isn’t too hard, but there are some extra stuff you can go for which can add to the challenge.

Because of the way this game looks it never really gained that much popularity outside of its native Japan, but if you enjoy games like Castlevania and Metroid you’ll be sure to enjoy Klonoa. The original Playstation version is very hard to get a hold of nowadays, but fortunately a remake has been released on the Nintendo Wii so be sure to check it out.

*Review originally published 2008

Related posts

Soul Calibur III

Soul Calibur III

The absence of an online mode and the unbalanced A.I detract a bit from the experience, but there is a wealth of single player modes and features to keep you coming back for more. With impressive graphics and a large roster of characters Soul Calibur III remains one of the best fighting games on the system. Patience is definitely required however. Gameplay: The CPU can be cheap as dirt in single player mode, but the game remains addictive and feature packed. Graphics: Without a doubt some of the best on the system. Sound: The music is good, but the announcer and English voice acting starts to grate very quickly.

Assassin’s Creed III

Assassin's Creed III

While the lead character, Conner, is not quite as charismatic or interesting as his predecessor, Ezio, the game is definitely not lacking in ambition. While it is the largest entry in the series to date, it can get bogged down in all kinds of menial tasks. The story is interesting and Desmond finally has his chance to shine but the story feels overly scripted with little of the freedom that the series was based on. Gameplay: Large and varied but less focussed than previous installments. Graphics: Beautiful in places but the setting is rather drab. Sound: Quality audio and effects.

Tomb Raider: Legend

Tomb Raider: Legend

After seeing how the Tomb Raider franchise was milked dry and ran into the ground I was a bit hesitant to pick up Legend. Fortunately Crystal Dynamics did a great job capturing all the elements that made the series a blockbuster back in the day. Its not a very long adventure, but despite a few annoyances it is well worth checking out. Gameplay: A welcome return to the roots of the series. Graphics: Good but could have been much better if created from the ground up for the Xbox360. Sound: Decent voice acting and a nice soundtrack.

Leave a comment

four × 4 =