QUAKE
Gameplay 9
Graphics 9
Sound 9

Every bit as playable as when it first came out Quake is a true classic and, while the plot might be non-existent, the action is non-stop. It also has enough mods and patches to keep you busy for a long, long time.

Gameplay: Fast & frantic.

Graphics: Pretty dated but there’s enough mods and updates to make it look very decent.

Sound: Creepy sound effects and spooky ambience

Summary 9.0 Outstanding
Gameplay 0
Graphics 0
Sound 0
Summary rating from user's marks. You can set own marks for this article - just click on stars above and press "Accept".
Accept
Summary 0.0 Terrible

QUAKE

Developer: id Software | Publisher: id Software | Release Date: 2007 | Genre: Action / First Person Shooter | Website: Official Website | Purchase: Steam

After creating such classics as Wolfenstein 3D, Doom and Doom 2 the world was anxious to see what ID Software would come up with next. The answer of course was Quake. Trading in the “2.5D” graphics of its peers in favour of full polygonal 3D, ID once again raised the bar for the genre.

Quake has a storyline but it seems like it was added almost as an afterthought and if it wasn’t for a few lines in the manual you would never have guessed it from playing the game. Apparently the military has experimented with teleportation technology and opened up slipgates to places they probably shouldn’t have. Some evil entity codenamed “Quake” promptly sent his own minions into our dimension and you are left as the last survivor of the over-run military base. Gun in hand, you enter the slipgate for some payback.

Just like the story the gameplay is also very reminiscent of Doom and feature four “Episodes” that can be completed in any order. The first episode was generously released as Shareware. The levels themselves are an interesting mix of medieval, Gothic and sci-fi inspired themes with some trademark ID pentagrams and other evil imagery thrown in as well. The 3D levels make for slightly trickier navigation as paths can stretch over, underneath and around each other. The complete lack of a map doesn’t make things any easier either. Levels do feel somewhat on the short side and the enemies, while menacing, never attack in the overwhelming hordes  Doom could throw at you. A limitation of the new technology perhaps?

Speaking of enemies, they looked a bit generic to me, but some like the Shambler and thing that jumps out at you still has the ability to frighten the daylights out of you if you don’t see them coming. The whole game has a very “Lovecraft” look and feel to it and the designers acknowledge this with the names of certain levels and monsters. Your means of fighting back consist of a big bloody axe, shotgun, nail-gun and rocket launcher. The ultimate weapon this time is a thunderbolt launching device that can make short work of any foe, but ammo for it is rather scarce and using it in water is fatal.

While the single player mode is good and can be played in co-op it’s no secret that the reason behind Quakes success is the online multi-player. One of the first titles in the genre that was as playable over the internet as it was across a LAN, Quake made its mark in the online arena and Quake deathmatches took over a lot of peoples lives. The Quake engine is also highly modifiable and this has resulted in over 1000 user made maps being freely available on the internet. The amount of custom modes and conversions also defies belief.

Quake was originally released in 1996 and while revolutionary for its time the graphics now look extremely brown and dated. The game was made available for download on Steam in 2007 giving players the winQuake port and the OpenGL version The OpenGL version improved things with higher resolutions and texture filtering, but for the ultimate Quake experience it’s recommended a custom engine like “Darkplaces” is used. These are available online and can update the visuals to levels that even modern gamers can appreciate. Of course there’s nothing preventing you from enjoying Quake in its native resolution if you feel like a retro experience. Included in the Steam version is also Quakeworld which will allow you to take on opponents in the online arenas with minimum configuration fuss.

Quakes soundtrack was composed by Trent Reznor of NIN fame, but because it was in the redbook audio format is not available with the downloadable versions. The good news is that it is easy to find online can be extracted to your Quake folder to restore everything to their former glory. The mouse controls that was so revolutionary in their time is an industry standard nowadays, so there’s not much to say about them.

Quake is an iconic title and a classic in its genre, but don’t be fooled that it’s just a museum piece now. Its still every bit as playable as it was all those years ago and kept me entertained from start to finish.

*Review originally published 2010.

System Requirements

  • A 100% Windows XP/Vista-compatible computer system

Related posts

Heroes & Legends: Conquerors of Kolhar

Heroes & Legends: Conquerors of Kolhar

Heroes & Legends: Conquerors of Kolhar offers a nice role playing fix without the investment in time required by the bigger titles. The emphasis is firmly on combat, so if this isn't your favorite aspect of the genre you can skip this one. Although your input is rather limited, there is still plenty of strategy involved and the game can become rather addictive. There are plenty of enemies to face and the game offers a nice challenge, which makes it ideal for whiling away a few hours. Gameplay: More strategic than it appears at first glance. Graphics: Nice visuals, but the animation is a bit sparse. Sound: Not a lot of variety, but what is on offer is good.

Submerged: Hidden Depths

Submerged: Hidden Depths

Submerged: Hidden Depths builds on the solid foundation of the first game with a bigger world, better visuals, and more things to do. Unfortunately, the game is still devoid of challenges, but its accessibility and lack of threats make for a very relaxing experience. While it will not appeal to everyone, it is a great title for fans of the first game or anyone looking for something calming to play between more challenging titles. Gameplay: The game is devoid of any challenges but enjoyable and relaxing to play. Graphics: Beautiful environments coupled with excellent water and weather effects. Sound: The haunting soundtrack and immersive sound effects complement the visuals nicely.

Mass Effect

Mass Effect

Gameplay: A nice blend of action and role playing. Graphics: A decent looking port. Sound: Very good. Mass Effect is yet another offering from Bioware that does not disappoint. The story is gripping and the characters interesting. Best of all, this is just the start of a trilogy, so there is still plenty of adventures ahead for Commander Shepard and his crew.

The Secret Order 5: The Buried Kingdom

The Secret Order 5: The Buried Kingdom

Although The Secret Order 5: The Buried Kingdom ditches the time traveling elements of the previous titles, it still offers some solid puzzles, mini games and hidden object scenes. This time the adventures of Sarah Pennington take her to a legendary buried kingdom on a quest to save her friend from the sinister Dragon Clan. The setting for The Buried Kingdom is more fantasy themed than the fourth installment, but features the same imagination and attention to detail that has made this series such a hit with fans. The Buried Kingdom doesn’t really advance the overall plot of the series much, but since it is such a self-contained adventure, it is also more accessible to newcomers who are unfamiliar with previous installments. Gameplay: Plenty of puzzles, mini games and hidden object scenes for players to sink their teeth into. Graphics: Lots of detailed hand-drawn locations that feature plenty of imaginative touches. Sound: The music is good and the voice acting is decent too.

Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Fathers 20th Anniversary Edition

Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Fathers 20th Anniversary Edition

Ask fans of the genre to name some of their favorite classic point & click adventure titles from the nineties and you can be sure that the name Gabriel Knight will crop up. Thanks to the dark and mature nature of the game it is perhaps not as well-known as the family friendly Lucasarts titles, but offered an experience that was memorable to say the least. From the voodoo steeped setting of New Orleans to the cast of memorable characters and enthralling storyline, Gabriel Knight was, no make that IS, a bona fide classic. Gameplay: A great version of a classic game. Graphics: Not perfect, especially the animations, but very good overall. Sound: The new voices take a while to get used to, but the soundtrack is superlative.

Papers, Please

Papers, Please

Papers, Please is one of those titles that you have to play in order to truly appreciate. It is hard to try to explain the concept to someone else without making it sound dull, but believe me the game will suck you in. With some thought provoking moral dilemmas and multiple endings you might find yourself coming back to this one again and again. Gameplay: A truly unique and engrossing experience. Graphics: The unique visual style matches the mood and setting of the game perfectly. Sound: Sparse but very fitting.

Leave a comment

fifteen − 10 =