Donut County
Gameplay 7
Graphics 8
Sound 9

Donut County gives players control of a hole in the ground and then asks them to swallow up everything in sight. The hole starts small but grows larger as it swallows up more of the scenery. For the most part, players simply move the hole around and watch things disappear down its depths, which is relaxing, but very easy. Some of the later levels introduce a few puzzle elements, but there’s nothing here that is going to tax anyone. That’s fine for players looking for a chill game to unwind with but also feels a bit like a missed opportunity as so much more could have been done with the concept.

Gameplay: Very easy to play and very relaxing, but don’t expect any sort of challenge.

Graphics: Simple, but quite charming.

Sound: The soundtrack is great and fits the style of the game

Summary 8.0 Great
Gameplay 0
Graphics 0
Sound 0
Summary rating from user's marks. You can set own marks for this article - just click on stars above and press "Accept".
Accept
Summary 0.0 Terrible

Donut County

Developer: Ben Esposito | Publisher: Annapurna Interactive | Release Date: 2018 | Genre: Casual / Adventure / Indie | Website: Official Website | Purchase: Steam

Donut County is a place inhabited by a range of anthropomorphic animals, including a raccoon named BK. He is ostensibly a donut shop employee tasked with delivering donuts but instead is somehow able to control a hole in the ground using his tablet. BK uses this hole to terrorize the inhabitants of Donut County until all of them end up nine hundred and ninety-nine feet below the ground. Thankfully, the Earth appears to be hollow, but since everyone is stuck there isn’t much to do except relay the stories of how BK used his holes to land them in their current predicament.

It’s ironic that a game all about controlling a deep hole that can swallow up anything in its path is lacking in depth, but that’s, unfortunately, the case with Donut County. That’s not to say that the game is not enjoyable, because it is, but it never offers much in the way of challenges or variation. Instead, each of the 20 plus levels features an area where BK can open a hole in the ground and then move it around to swallow up anything that will fit inside it. Keeping with the tradition of games like Katamari, the hole becomes larger the more things it consumes. This means that while initially it’s barely big enough to swallow up rocks and grass, eventually it can topple buildings. Unlike Katamari, though, there are no scores or timers, which makes for a very chill experience.

Donut County features very simple low poly visuals with a cell-shaded pastel look. This allows for a very charming looking game that is unlikely to tax any halfway decent computer. Unlike the large, open levels of games like Katamari, Donut County is split into single-screen levels that are viewed from mostly fixed camera angles. The levels range from the residences of the various characters to more exotic locations like the ranger station, a campground, beach, chicken barn, and lagoon. Each level is punctuated by some story sections where the characters bicker amongst each other while BK protests his innocence in the whole matter. Completing a level also unlocks new entries in the “Trashopedia” which is a list of humorous descriptions for the items that you have dropped down the hole.

From a technical standpoint, Donut County has a few preset graphic quality options and allows players to change the resolution. There’s some decent physics modeling, so watching stuff fall down the hole is quite satisfying, but there’s no way to fail a level. The game occasionally introduces new features like a catapult that can be used to launch things out of the hole, but it’s only in the last few levels that some puzzle elements are introduced.

These feature a couple of interesting ideas but are still simple enough that most players will be able to breeze through the whole game in one sitting. It is possible to replay levels, but without scores or challenges, there’s not much of a reason to do so.

The Donut County audio is decent enough thanks to a rather unique soundtrack filled with memorable tunes. All the speech in the game is also of the gibberish sounding variety, so players have to read the subtitles to find out what is being said. There’s plenty of humor in the interactions between the characters, but not everyone is going to find it funny. The dialogue definitely seems skewed more towards the younger generation, so older players will probably find the whole thing to be random and goofy. The easiest way to control Donut County is via mouse where the hole basically becomes your cursor. You simply move it below something smaller than the hole itself and watch it tumble down before moving on to other targets. The slow pace of the game means that reflexes are not really a requirement, except bizarrely enough in the boss fight that appears out of nowhere on the final level. It’s still pretty casual by most standards but might surprise players used to the pace of the preceding levels.

Donut County features an interesting idea and very relaxing gameplay, but it also feels like it could have been a lot more. It’s a great title for players who simply want something relaxing to finish before moving on to more challenging titles, but those looking for puzzles and innovation will be disappointed.

System Requirements

  • Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
  • OS: Windows 7
  • Processor: Intel Core2 Duo E8400
  • Memory: 2 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Radeon HD 3870
  • DirectX: Version 9.0c
  • Storage: 500 MB available space
  • Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
  • OS: Windows 10
  • Processor: Intel Core i3-4170 or better
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GT 640 or better
  • DirectX: Version 11
  • Storage: 1 GB available space
  • Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
  • OS: Mac OS X 10.9+ (Mavericks)
  • Processor: Intel Core2 Duo E8400
  • Memory: 2 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Radeon HD 3870
  • Storage: 200 MB available space
  • Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
  • OS: Mac OS X 10.10+ (Yosemite)
  • Processor: Intel Core i3-4170 or better
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GT 640 or better
  • Storage: 1 GB available space

Related posts

The Eternal Castle [REMASTERED]

The Eternal Castle [REMASTERED]

The Eternal Castle [Remastered] definitely looks the part of a game from an era where CGA visuals were the norm, but don't be fooled into thinking that it is a dusty retro title. Instead, it is a fast paced and challenging adventure that makes use of the limited color palette in ways that real games from that era could only dream of. The animations are also top notch and so is the soundtrack, but the controls can be very challenging if you are not used to this type of game. Overall, it's a great game if you remember early PC platformers with fondness, but modern players will also enjoy it if they can learn to appreciate the visual style. Gameplay: Although short, the game is a lot of fun despite some occasionally frustrating bits. Graphics: The art style looks very primitive in screenshots, but has to be seen in action to truly appreciate the detail and animations. Sound: The synth soundtrack is incredible.

Batman: Arkham Asylum Game of the Year Edition

Batman: Arkham Asylum Game of the Year Edition

Batman: Arkham Asylum is as close to perfection as I have ever seen a game based upon a comic license come. Rocksteady Studios have come out of nowhere and released the definitive Batman game. Fans of the caped crusader will love this game but even if you only have a passing interest in the character you will find a lot to enjoy here. This game of the year edition adds a few extras to an already great game. Gameplay: Polished and engaging, this is the best Batman game yet. Graphics: Excellent visual style that retains the gritty look of the comic books. Sound: Excellent voice overs all round and great music.

MURI

MURI

If you remember the classic DOS era platformers such as Duke Nukem, Commander Keen and Bio Menace then you will love Muri. Everything from the visuals and sound right down to the frame rate is a homage to these early titles. It is rare to see a title embrace these kinds of limitations so faithfully and still manage to deliver an entertaining experience. Gameplay: Perfectly captures the run-and-gun platforming feel of a DOS era title. Graphics: 16-Color EGA at its best. Sound: Faithfully recreates the PC speaker sounds.

Serious Sam 3: BFE

Serious Sam 3: BFE

Serious Sam 3: BFE is not as colorful or over the top as its predecessor, but it is still a great title for players in search of frantic action. The game slows down a little too much in some parts, but few other games can come close in terms of the sheer mayhem when all hell breaks out. It is definitely a game that is best enjoyed with some friends as there are plenty of co-op modes and options to keep everyone happy. Gameplay: The campaign starts a little slow, but overall the game still has plenty of action. Graphics: It is not as colorful as Serious Sam 2 and definitely shows its age, but some of the set pieces and enemies remain impressive. Sound: The soundtrack is excellent, and the iconic enemy sounds are all present.

Euclidean

Euclidean

Euclidean is a game of geometric horror that tries very hard to make use of Lovecraftian elements to inspire dread, but only manages frustration instead. Not only is it hard to see what is going on around you, but the controls are also sluggish to the point of feeling useless. Instant death is very common, forcing players to restart the level, but mercifully the levels are short and there are only nine of them. Unless you are a huge fan of Lovecraft, can handle frustration and can find this game on sale, it is not really recommended. Gameplay: Fall down very slowly while battling sluggish controls in order to avoid enemies. Graphics: Enemies are far from scary and the whole thing is just too dark and foggy for its own good. Sound: The ambient soundtrack is good, but the taunting voice can become repetitive.

Omega Pattern

Omega Pattern

Omega Pattern is a visual novel where you follow the story of a young man named Shaiel who is on the run from a ruthless organization called Bioagora. His psychic skills make him an important target for Bioagora, who has a history of turning gifted people into brainwashed agents to do their bidding. The game doesn’t just tell the story of Shaiel in the present, but also features plenty of flashbacks where you actually get to make choices that influences the route you take to the ending. This gives the game some nice replay value and the different routes are actually quite different and not just minor variations. Unfortunately, Omega Pattern is also quite short and since it is only the first part of the full story, it ends in a “To Be Continued,” which might annoy some fans. Gameplay: The story is genuinely intriguing and the choices you get to make actually impacts the story, which is a nice touch. Graphics: Nothing really special, but gets the job done. Sound: No voice acting, but the soundtrack is really solid.

Leave a comment

10 + 8 =