Dragon Age: Origins – Leliana’s Song
Gameplay 7
Graphics 7
Sound 7

Leliana’s Song is a pretty short standalone campaign, which is a must download for fans of the sneaky bard and Dragon Age completionists. As for the rest, well if you are not tired of Dragon Age yet and don’t mind shelling out for a very short adventure then you can do far worse than this.

Gameplay: Pretty short, but action packed and polished.

Graphics: Same old Dragon Age, nothing new.

Sound: Some nice voice acting throughout

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Dragon Age: Origins – Leliana’s Song

Developer: Bioware | Publisher: Electronic Arts | Release Date: 2010 | Genre: Role Playing Game / DLC | Website: Official Website | Format: Digital Download

Take control of the Orlesian bard, Leliana, in this standalone campaign that takes place many years before the events of Dragon Age: Origins. For Leliana fans, this is a great chance to find out why she joined the Chantry as well as meet a few characters from her past like Marjolain, Sketch and Tug. Clocking in at just over two hours and with a price tag of  $6.99 this latest bit of Dragon Age DLC is either a must-have purchase or overpriced added quest, depending on how much you like the character and original game.

Since this DLC is so short there’s not much I can say without spoilers, but anyone that has spent time talking to Leliana in the main game should know exactly what to expect. Leliana starts out fully equipped and at level ten in the Denerim Market along with her two companions and mentor for a night of tricks and pranks. It’s refreshing to see a different side to Leliana as I found her self righteousness in the original game to be somewhat annoying. It’s a pity that the locations doesn’t offer anything new but at least the new music is nice and the voice-overs are a welcome bonus.

I found Leliana’s two companions, Sketch and Tug to be rather unremarkable, although her mentor, Marjolain provides a few memorable moments. The game moves at quite a fast pace and you’ll level up a few times before the credits roll. There’s a few new achievements and a transferable item to aim for if you are a completionist but the quest still feels like it’s over way too soon. The ending is also a bit of an anti-climax and none of the plot twists are really much of a surprise.

Leliana fans should have a blast with this, but everyone that already had enough of Dragon Age will balk at paying $7 for this. It’s clear to see that a bit more effort has gone into the making of this, but for the price I was expecting just a little bit more.

If you have already worked your way through all the other Dragon Age content and is still craving more then by all means give Leliana’s Song a try. It doesn’t progress the main storyline at all but instead provides a fascinating glimpse into the events that changed Leliana into the character we meet in Origins.

*Review originally published 2010.

System Requirements

  • OS: Windows XP (SP3) or Windows Vista (SP1) or Windows 7
  • Processor: Intel Core 2 Single 1.6 Ghz Processor (or equivalent) or AMD 64 2.0 GHz Processor (or equivalent)
  • Memory: 1GB (1.5 GB Vista and Windows 7)
  • Graphics: ATI Radeon X850 256MB or NVIDIA GeForce 6600 GT 128MB or greater (Windows Vista: Radeon X1550 256 MB or NVidia GeForce 7600GT 256MB)
  • DirectX®: DirectX (November 2007)
  • Hard Drive: 20 GB HD space
  • Sound: Direct X Compatible Sound Card
  • OS: Windows XP (SP3) or Windows Vista (SP1) or Windows 7
  • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo 2.4 Ghz or AMD Phenom II X2 Dual-Core 2.7 Ghz Processor or equivalent
  • Memory: 2 GB (3GB Vista and Windows 7)
  • Graphics: ATI 3850 512 MB or NVidia 8800GTS 512MB or greater
  • DirectX®: DirectX (November 2007)
  • Hard Drive: 20 GB HD space
  • Sound: Direct X Compatible Sound Card

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