Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion
Gameplay 8
Graphics 7
Sound 8

After committing tax evasion, Turnip Boy is indebted to the mayor of Veggieville, who sends him off on all kinds of fetch quests in this lighthearted, top-down adventure. The game is short and accessible, with plenty of humor, but the memes and pop culture references might not appeal to everyone. It also features quite a bit of backtracking for such a short game. Nevertheless, it’s hard not to be charmed by Turnip Boy and his weird obsession with ripping up every piece of paper he finds.

Gameplay: Players must help Turnip Boy explore Veggieville and its surroundings while killing enemies, solving puzzles, and fetching items for NPCs.

Graphics: The visual style resembles a Gameboy Color Legend of Zelda game but has plenty of charm.

Sound: The soundtrack for the game is varied and quite catchy

Summary 7.7 Great
Gameplay 0
Graphics 0
Sound 0
Summary rating from user's marks. You can set own marks for this article - just click on stars above and press "Accept".
Accept
Summary 0.0 Terrible

Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion

Developer: Snoozy Kazoo | Publisher: Graffiti Games | Release Date: 2021 | Genre: Action / Adventure / Indie | Website: Official Website | Purchase: Steam

Picture this: after failing to pay property taxes, Mayor Onion evicts Turnip Boy from his greenhouse. But that’s not all. In a twist of fate, the mayor decides that until the taxes are paid off, Turnip Boy must perform menial tasks for him. And so begins a single-player adventure set in Veggieville, a seemingly post-apocalyptic world where vegetables have risen to dominance but still face threats from enemies like snails and other vegetarians. This unique setting sets the stage for a quirky and engaging gameplay experience.   

Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion is a top-down adventure title that shares more than a passing resemblance to Gameboy Color classics like Links Awakening. As Turnip Boy, players get to run around an overworld while talking to NPCs and hacking away at enemies before venturing into dungeons for some puzzles and boss battles. There are no stats to worry about, no experience to earn, and no grinding needed to advance. Instead, players are given instructions by Mayor Onion to fetch something silly like a fork or a laser pointer and return it to him. Along the way, Turnip Boy can acquire items or abilities that will help open up new areas. The game world is not that big, though, and even without a map, it’s almost impossible to get stuck or lost. Handy signposts are scattered everywhere, so players always know which direction to head, and it’s always very obvious where new items or abilities are needed to proceed. 

In addition to a penchant for ripping up every piece of paper he finds, Turnip Boy also has no qualms about murder, vandalism, and property theft. For such an innocent and happy-go-lucky-looking vegetable, Turnip Boy will happily kill a snail for not paying its rent, steal a watering can from an old lemon, and tear up a love letter in front of its author. As should be evident from the title, this game doesn’t take itself very seriously and is filled to the brim with memes and pop culture references. Some of these are laugh-out-loud funny, but how well they will age remains to be seen. 

Visually, Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion looks like a high-definition Gameboy Color game with beautiful pixel art graphics and vibrant colors. Turnip Boys’ adventures will take him through Veggieville, a forest, farmhouse, barn, graveyard, and more. Each of these is populated with fellow vegetables as well as enemies like worms, sheep, mutated animals, and candy. Speaking to NPCs also shows neat close-up portraits of their faces, and each boss comes with their own little introduction animation. Turnip Boy is already a very endearing protagonist, but players can also find and equip a variety of hats. These are all purely cosmetic but are charming, to say the least. The character animations in the game are all pretty basic, but this doesn’t detract from the experience at all.

Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion delivers in the audio department with a soundtrack featuring a whole range of different genres. Every area in the game has its own tune, and there’s even a song with vocals after completing it. The sound effects are passable, although we are not fans of the burping sound that accompanies every health pick-up. As is typical for small indie titles, Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion does not feature any voice acting. Most conversations in the game are short and text only, but Turnip Boy never utters a word or says anything. Other characters still react like he does, though, which is pretty funny.

Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion can be played with a keyboard or controller but does not support a mouse. Combat is hack-and-slash, and Turnip Boy has only one primary attack. In addition to hitting enemies, Turnip Boy can use his sword to cut through plants blocking his way. Instead of a dodge, Turnip Boy has a “trip” button that functions similarly and is helpful for some of the faster bosses. Finally, a “use” button activates whatever secondary item Turnip Boy has equipped. Players can open their inventory to select the items to equip or cycle through them with a button. These range from a watering can that can make certain plants grow to an item that can create portals between which Turnip Boy can warp. The growable items include boombloom plants that can be used to blow up rocks and blocked doorways, as well as watermelons that can be used to plug gaps in the floor. The combination of portals and bombs, as well as being able to set fire to certain things, make up most of the puzzles in the game. Boss battles tend to be straightforward, and all of them can be killed by dodging and attacking, but a few die quicker if players use the environment to deal extra damage to them. If players die, they are taken back to a nearby checkpoint, but dying during a boss battle means having to sit through their entire intro animation again.

As fun as Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion is, it’s worth mentioning that it is a very short experience. The main story should last most players only about two hours, and even returning to get all the achievements won’t add too much playtime. Finding and ripping up all the documents in the game will reveal the true final boss and a different ending, and there’s even a timer that can be toggled for players who want to speedrun the game. After the game’s release, the developers added some additional hats, but the most significant update is “Sunset Station.” This adds a “Limitless Line” mode for players who have completed the game and offers a roguelike experience like The Binding of Isaac, where players fight through rooms of enemies and bosses. After each boss, players get to choose from three different trinkets to help improve their odds of victory. These include items that have a chance to set enemies on fire with every hit, increased speed, longer tripping distance, and more. As players progress further in this mode, they will also encounter elite enemies that are bigger, more resilient, or poisonous versions of regular enemies and bosses. Limitless Line is fun for a few rounds, but the only rewards are tickets that can be spent on even more hats.  

Overall, Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion is a charming and lighthearted game with some dark undertones lurking beneath its colorful exterior. The short length and abundance of fetch quests will turn away some players, but the irreverent sense of humor kept us coming back for more. 

System Requirements

  • Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
  • OS: Microsoft® Windows® 10
  • Processor: 1.2GHz processor (Intel Core i5 and up)
  • Memory: 1 GB RAM
  • Graphics: DirectX 10, 11, or 12 compatible card
  • DirectX: Version 10
  • Storage: 600 MB available space
  • Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
  • OS: Microsoft® Windows® 10
  • Processor: Dual Core Intel i5 and above
  • Memory: 2 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GeForce 700 series or greater
  • DirectX: Version 11
  • Storage: 600 MB available space
  • OS: Mac OS 64 bit
  • Processor: Dual Core 2 Ghz CPU
  • Memory: 1 GB RAM
  • Graphics: 1 GB Video Memory
  • Storage: 600 MB available space
  • OS: Mac OS 64 bit (High Sierra 10.13+)
  • Processor: Dual Core Intel i5 and above
  • Memory: 2 GB RAM
  • Graphics: 2 GB Video Memory
  • Storage: 600 MB available space
  • OS: Ubuntu 20.4, Ubuntu 18.04, and CentOS 7
  • Processor: x64 architecture with SSE2 instruction set support.
  • Memory: 1 GB RAM
  • Graphics: OpenGL 3.2+, Vulkan capable.
  • Storage: 600 MB available space
  • OS: Ubuntu 20.4, Ubuntu 18.04, and CentOS 7
  • Memory: 2 GB RAM
  • Storage: 600 MB available space

Related posts

9-nine-:Episode 4

9-nine-:Episode 4

9-Nine-: Episode 4 returns players once more to the college town of Shiromitsugawa where Kakeru Niimi and his gang of artifact users battle a threat from a different dimension. This episode upholds the same high standards as the rest of the series and the story really is an emotional rollercoaster. It's not the best place to get started with the series, but fans of the previous episodes won't want to miss out on this one. Gameplay: Very engrossing and packed with humor, action, and drama. Graphics: The character sprites and CGs are still some of the best in the genre. Sound: Great voice acting and a solid soundtrack.

Forward to the Sky

Forward to the Sky

Help a sword-wielding princess take on the skeletal enemies and traps of the sky tower in this third-person title by Animu Game. The visuals and audio are decent, but the game is just way too short and simple. It can be completed in less than two hours and most of it will be spent solving some basic puzzles along with the occasional bit of combat. With a bit more polish and a few more levels Forward to the Sky could have been great, but as it is there are much better options available. Gameplay: The controls could definitely have been tighter and the overall experience is very short. Graphics: Bright and colorful, but not much in terms of variety. Sound: Passable background music and voice acting.

The Way We ALL GO

The Way We ALL GO

Anyone looking for a well written visual novel where the focus is actually on the story and not any fan service will enjoy The Way We All Go. It offers a great combination of slice of life drama and horror which makes for quite a compelling experience. With more than 20 different endings the replay value is also very high considering the price tag. As long as you can look past the visuals there is plenty to enjoy about The Way We All Go. Gameplay: The story starts off rather slow, but remains compelling and definitely ends with a bang. Graphics: Decent, but a far cry from the best that the genre has to offer. Sound: Good music and sound effects.

Dogfighter

Dogfighter

Its always good to go into a game with no expectations and be pleasantly surprised. Dogfighter is a highly addictive experience that will have you chasing rankings and achievements long into the night. A great game from a great indie developer. Gameplay: All the fun and maddness of a first person shooter but with added dimensions. Graphics: Stylish & detailed. Sound: Good sound effects but the limited music gets a bit repetitive.

BioShock Infinite

BioShock Infinite

While it might not have a multi-player mode and doesn't stray as far from the familiar Bioshock experience as you might think, Infinite is an outstanding game with a lot to offer. With intense combat, an eye opening storyline and unwillingness to back away from sensitive topics, Infinite is a game that should not be missed. Gameplay: Familiar yet fresh, Infinite is a worthy successor to the Bioshock franchise. Graphics: Looks great even on moderate hardware. Sound: Excellent voice acting and a great musical score.

Icebound

Icebound

With its Steampunk fantasy setting and fleshed out characters Icebound is a Western visual novel that definitely shouldn’t be overlooked. The writing is for the most part very good and the story features plenty of intrigue. The visuals are a bit rough in places, but the excellent soundtrack deserves a special mention. It is a must for visual novel fans, but the puzzle elements and great story will appeal to other players as well. Gameplay: Icebound features a great story, interesting setting and even some nice puzzle mini-games. Graphics: Good, but rather uneven. Sound: No voice acting, but the soundtrack is superb.

Leave a comment

1 + 12 =