Incredipede
Gameplay 9
Graphics 9
Sound 7

Incredipede is a very unique puzzle title that challenges you to complete levels by controlling the muscles of one of the most bizarre characters to ever feature in a game. In easy mode, you are provided with a unique design for your creature every level, but in hard mode, it is up to you to come up with your own working designs. Throw in a sandbox mode as well as level editor and you have a game that can keep you entertained for far longer than expected. This game also has some of the most unique and eye catching visual styles that we have seen in a while.

Gameplay: Quite challenging and frequently frustrating, but always fun.

Graphics: The art style is gorgeous, although the animations can be a little creepy.

Sound: Sparse, but very fitting

Summary 8.3 Outstanding
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Incredipede

Developer: Colin Northway with art by Thomas Shahan | Publisher: Northway Games | Release Date: 2013 | Genre: Simulation/ Adventure / Indie | Website: Official Website | Purchase: Steam

Incredipede is a game about a peculiar creature, named Quozzle, who is on a quest to rescue her sisters from some rather unsavory invaders that showed up to disrupt the tranquility of her home. However, in order to have any chance of rescuing them, Quozzle will have to traverse three worlds that are fraught with danger and obstacles. Along the way she will also have to collect numerous collectibles in order to appease the guardians that watch over the gates to the next world. This is a mission that would have been tricky enough if Quozzle was a usual platform game hero, like a humanoid or animal, but she is most definitely not. Instead, Quozzle is an incredipede, which means her body basically consists of a giant eyeball that has sprouted numerous arms and legs. In another strange twist, she is able to grow new arms and legs in order to change her shape.

Incredipede feels like two games in one, depending on the difficulty level you select. Playing on “Normal” first is highly recommended as it will allow you to get a feel for the unique control method. Your object remains the same, collect the items on the level and then make your way towards the beam of light that signifies the exit, but the way you do so will differ dramatically. In “Normal” mode you are given a premade creature to work with, while “Hard” mode busts things wide open and gives you full control over designing your own one. Playing through “Normal” mode will give you a good idea of just how many creature combinations are available, but the sky is the limit when it comes to making your own. Of course, it is also possible to create highly impractical creatures, but half the fun is figuring out what works and what doesn’t.

The thing that makes Incredipede so unique and challenging is the control scheme. Instead of controlling the movement of your creature directly, you are only able to influence the directions in which the limbs move via the muscles. This is still relatively easy with one set of muscles, but soon you’ll gain control of another set, which means it takes four keys just to make your creature move. Having to then still wrap your head around what type of gymnastics is required to get to the collectibles is the source of a lot of frustration as well as fun. You’ll have to master moves like swinging, gliding, climbing, diving, swimming and leaping if you want to have a shot at completing the 120 levels on offer. New obstacles, such as boulders, lava, water and strong winds are gradually introduced, but levels are short enough that they can be completed in seconds if you figure out what needs to be done. You can also press “Space Bar” to instantly restart a level, which is something you’ll appreciate when you mess up. It can take multiple tries before you’ll be able to complete certain levels even if you know exactly what needs to be done, just because the control scheme is so diabolical.

Another thing about Incredipede that immediately stands out is the visuals. The game has a very unique look, which comes courtesy of an artist by the name of Thomas Shahan. Apparently his primary medium is woodblocks, but after the developer of Incredipede saw some of his work on Wikipedia, he managed to get in touch with Thomas and convince him to handle the visuals for the game. The result is a game with eye catching visuals that look unlike anything else out there. Considering the sheer amount of creature combinations and ways for your creature to move the animation is quite impressive. It has to be said that it can be a little unsettling to see your creature flail about helplessly if you design it poorly. The fact that it is possible to feel pity for something as alien looking as Quozzle says a lot about the great art direction of the game. The music isn’t bad either, but since the levels are so short you will only hear most of the tracks if you get stuck. Typically, levels start out eerily quiet and the music only kicks in after a while. As for the controls, it really takes a lot of effort to master them, but the feeling of satisfaction when your creature finally lurches into the exit point after collecting everything is hard to beat.

While “Normal” mode is challenging enough, it feels like it was just an extended tutorial for the game once you begin to tackle “Hard” mode. Here you can really let your imagination loose and come up with the most unique creatures you can think of. The game even allows you to save the creatures that you have created and send them to a friend who owns the game, so that they can try out your abominations. Just in case you think that the 120 levels that are included with the game are not enough, it also has a level editor for making your own ones and you can load levels created by other players straight from within the game. At the time of writing this review there is about 112 pages of levels available and while not all of them are good, there are some great ones in the mix. We also have to mention the achievements in this game, which has nothing to do with the actual game, but instead requires you to research and interact with actual insects. Obviously you can simply cheat and claim to have done what the game asks of you, but where is the fun in that?

As long as you don’t mind failing a lot and can handle a control scheme that requires a bit more thought than usual you will enjoy Incredipede. It is a game that looks great, provides an entertaining challenge and it has plenty of reasons to keep playing thanks to the level editor and creature designer. Even if you grow tired of the levels, it is still a lot of fun to mess around in the sandbox mode to see what is the weirdest design that you can come up with. The graphics of Incredipde has also aged quite well, so it looks as vibrant and unique as I did back when it was first release. If you like unique puzzle titles, then you really shouldn’t hesitate to add Incredipede to your library.

System Requirements

  • Processor:1.6Ghz processor
  • Memory:1 GB RAM
  • Hard Drive:200 MB HD space
  • Additional:Some old graphics cards may not support the hardware acceleration in Incredipede. The complete list of supported cards is here: http://blog.r3c7.net/stage3davailablegpu/
  • Processor:1.6Ghz processor
  • Memory:1 GB RAM
  • Hard Drive:200 MB HD space
  • Additional:Some old graphics cards may not support the hardware acceleration in Incredipede. The complete list of supported cards is here: http://blog.r3c7.net/stage3davailablegpu/

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