The Way We ALL GO
Gameplay 9
Graphics 5
Sound 8

Anyone looking for a well written visual novel where the focus is actually on the story and not any fan service will enjoy The Way We All Go. It offers a great combination of slice of life drama and horror which makes for quite a compelling experience. With more than 20 different endings the replay value is also very high considering the price tag. As long as you can look past the visuals there is plenty to enjoy about The Way We All Go.

Gameplay: The story starts off rather slow, but remains compelling and definitely ends with a bang.

Graphics: Decent, but a far cry from the best that the genre has to offer.

Sound: Good music and sound effects

Summary 7.3 Great
Gameplay 0
Graphics 0
Sound 0
Summary rating from user's marks. You can set own marks for this article - just click on stars above and press "Accept".
Accept
Summary 0.0 Terrible

The Way We ALL GO

Developer: ebi-hime | Publisher: Sekai Project |Release Date: 2015 | Genre: Indie / Visual Novel | Website: Official Website | Format: Digital Download

Two years after moving to the big city with his parents, a young boy named Atcchan returns to the small Japanese village where he grew up. Atcchan took the seven hour journey by train to visit his grandparents, but he actually also has some unfinished business to attend to. Although Atcchan kept in touch with one of his childhood friends after leaving the village he neglected to even tell the other one about the move. Since his stay will only last three days, Atcchan has to decide who he wants to spend time with and whether or not to make amends before returning to the city.

The Way We All Go is a visual novel where you get to choose how and with who Atcchan spends his available time in the village. His one friend Amu is a loud and boisterous girl who takes please in embarrassing and teasing the rather timid protagonist, but there is also the shy and reserved Noelle who might be upset over him leaving without saying goodbye. The majority of the story is a slice of life tale where you are given plenty of choices about who Atcchan hangs out with and how he responds to what they say or ask. Despite the fact that the first part of the game deals with rather mundane things the writing is very good, which kept me engaged. Since there are plenty of choices to make it also ensures that the story remains interesting. However, although the tale is realistic things take a rather dark turn towards the end and things become very disturbing very fast. The first time it happened it caught me completely by surprise and I could only shake my head in disbelief about what transpired.

Unlike most visual or kinetic novels, The Way We All Go doesn’t just feature a couple of different endings, but there are a whopping 21 possible outcomes to the story. After most of the endings I reached involved murder, double murders, gruesome accidents and even suicides I started losing hope of anything remotely happy occurring, but thankfully there were a few outcomes that didn’t involve bloodshed. This gives the game plenty of replay value and it is definitely worth the effort of seeking out all the endings. You can skip text that you have already seen which speeds up the process, but even after completing the game multiple times I still discovered new paths that suddenly put a whole new spin on things. In fact, I even encountered paths that introduced brand new characters and scenarios which is really neat.

While the writing is excellent the visuals of The Way We All Go definitely shows that the developers didn’t have a very large budget to work with. There are only a couple of different character sprites and all the backgrounds look like simple photographs with filters applied to make them look painted. Although not bad, compared to the polished visuals of other titles published by Sekai Project the art in The Way We All Go definitely looks a bit amateurish. This is especially noticeable in the CG scenes where characters look different from their normal sprites and some of the characters look like they were drawn in a completely different style. There are no options for the visuals beyond opting to play in full screen or windowed mode either, with the former resulting in black bars on the sides of the screen. The Way We All Go doesn’t have any sexual content, although there is a bit of fan service depending on certain choices you make. The text can be rather descriptive regarding the gorier elements, but visually the depiction of violence is rather mild.

The game does not feature any voice acting, but there are plenty of music tracks. Judging by the in-game music player, most of the tracks are free stock music, but this definitely doesn’t mean they are bad. Some of the tunes fit the atmosphere of the game to a T, especially the title track, Gone Beyond by Kevin Mcleod. With almost 30 tunes to listen to there are at least plenty of variety. The game also features a whole host of sound effects which is always great.

It would be easy to dismiss The Way We All Go because of the visuals, but I think that all fans of the genre should definitely check it out for the story. It shares some similarities with titles such as Higurashi, When They Cry, but without the mystery elements. Thanks to the low price tag and the numerous endings it is easy to recommend the game to anyone with an interest in the genre or who simply wants to read a good story. I would have liked to see better Steam integration, such as achievements for the different endings and maybe even trading cards, but as it is the game is still worth the asking price. Best of all it has a demo available, so you can check it out and decide for yourself.

System Requirements

  • OS: Win XP+
  • Processor: 1Ghz
  • Memory: 512 MB RAM
  • Graphics: DirectX or OpenGL compatible card
  • DirectX: Version 9.0c
  • Hard Drive: 400 MB available space
  • Sound Card: Integrated
  • OS: 10.6
  • Processor: 1Ghz
  • Memory: 512 MB RAM
  • Graphics: DirectX or OpenGL compatible card
  • Hard Drive: 400 MB available space
  • OS: x86/x86_64
  • Processor: 1Ghz
  • Memory: 512 MB RAM
  • Graphics: DirectX or OpenGL compatible card
  • Hard Drive: 400 MB available space

Related posts

F.E.A.R. 3

F.E.A.R. 3

The series is moving away even further from its creepy horror roots and starting to feel a bit like a typical "Call of Duty" style shooter. There's still a few nice ideas, but the scares are thin on the ground and the story isn't exactly gripping. The co-op seems to have been the main focus of the game and works well. Gameplay: The shooting mechanics are solid but it loses that spooky "F.E.A.R" feeling along the way. Graphics: Looks good and the environments are a bit more varied than before. Sound: Nothing but silence from the lead character, but overall the voices and music is decent.

Haunt the House: Terrortown

Haunt the House: Terrortown

Haunt The House might not be the longest or most challenging game I've played, but it has a unique setting, stylish visuals and offers plenty of entertainment. Scaring people with the strange actions you can coax out of ordinary objects is surprisingly fun and each location offers plenty of unique opportunities to try out your poltergeist skills. Gameplay: Very simple, but quite entertaining. Graphics: Detailed and charming visuals. Sound: Nice tunes and plenty of sound effects.

Ultima 7: The Black Gate

Ultima 7: The Black Gate

This might just be one of the best Role Playing experiences ever created by Origin Systems. A huge world to explore and interact with and hundreds of characters to talk to. The scope of this quest is vast and this significantly raises the ante for future role playing games. Gameplay: A vast world to explore with tons of things to see and do. Graphics: A big step up from Ultima 6. Sound: Not bad considering how long you will spend listening to the tunes.

Imprint-X

Imprint-X

Imprint-X is a unique entry in the puzzle genre that not only requires memorization and pattern recognition, but some quick reflexes as well. The entire game is based around the concept of pushing buttons, although accomplishing this feat is a lot trickier than you might think. It is a game that leaves it up to you to figure out what is required to succeed, but sadly it is not quite as addictive as some of the best titles in the genre. Regardless, it is definitely different and well worth checking out considering its price tag. Gameplay: The game starts off very easy, but later levels will thoroughly test your memorization and reflexes. Graphics: The cut-scenes and art style probably won’t appeal to everyone, but the overall look of the game is quite nice. Sound: The background music is great and never becomes annoying.

Beat Hazard

Beat Hazard

If you are tired of boring licensed tracks by bands you've never heard of and dull brown shooters then Beat Hazard is a revelation. The ability to play to your own music collection is nice and the visuals, while over the top, are certainly colorful. It's not something you are going to be constantly playing, but you will find yourself coming back to it. Gameplay: As long as you have music you'll have fun. Graphics: Retina searing bursts of color. Sound: Depending on your taste this is obviously the best part of the game.

Abyss: The Wraiths of Eden

Abyss: The Wraiths of Eden

Abyss: Wraiths of Eden is yet another very enjoyable hidden object game from one of the best developers in the genre. The setting might not be that original, but looks great and makes for an interesting story. Since it is a rather easy title it is a good starting point for newcomers, but it is polished enough that even veterans will enjoy the experience. Gameplay: Easy to complete, but remains enjoyable throughout. Graphics: The hand drawn visuals look great, but the close-up character animations are not the best. Sound: Nice music, but the voice acting could have been better.

Leave a comment

18 + 16 =