Alan Wake’s American Nightmare
Gameplay 8
Graphics 8
Sound 8

American Nightmare offers more action and less atmosphere than the original game, but it is still a compelling addition to the series. With only three locations to explore it lacks the depth of the first game, but the story is still very interesting. It is important to remember that this is not a sequel, but a bite sized addition to the Alan Wake saga.

Gameplay: A more action oriented approach than the original game.

Graphics: Good but the wide open areas makes it less creepy.

Sound: Overall good, but some of the voice acting could have been better

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Alan Wake’s American Nightmare

Developer: Remedy Entertainment | Publisher: Remedy Entertainment | Release Date: 2012 | Genre: Action / Adventure / 3rd Person Shooter | Website: Official Website | Purchase: Steam

As the proud owner of a limited collector’s edition of Alan Wake I was immediately interested when I heard about American Nightmare. Instead of being a sequel or even DLC this is an action oriented side story that pits Alan against his most fearsome foe yet, himself.

Fans of the original game will remember the “Night Springs” show that played on television sets around the gameworld. American Nightmare takes place as an episode of this show with Alan racing to stop his evil doppelganger, Mr. Scratch from creating havoc. While Night Springs is a fictional town, it appears that Alan has managed to write it into existence in the middle of Arizona as the battleground for his showdown with Mr. Scratch. It has been two years since his disappearance from the real world and it looks like he has become a lot more adept at dealing with the “Taken.”

Alan Wake’s American Nightmare was originally released as a Xbox Live Arcade title so do not expect the same kind of in-depth adventure as the original game. Instead, you have the “Story” mode which is a four-to-five hour scenario set in Night Springs and its surroundings and an “Arcade” mode which is a ten minute battle for survival in various arenas. The story mode only has three major locations which is the town, Observatory and drive-in, each with only one non-player character who sends you off on various fetch quests. It feels very cut-down in comparison to the original game, but the story is still a fascinating tale. Mr. Scratch makes regular appearances on the televisions dotted throughout the game and taunts Alan about what he is going to do with his friend and loved ones. These clips as well as some of the other cut-scenes in the game use full motion videos of real actors which adds to the cheese late night sci-fi show feel of the game.

Gameplay still consists of collecting manuscript pages and battling shadowy enemies known as the “Taken” but the suspense has taken a back seat to the action. The locations are all wide open and lack the claustrophobic feel of the woods in the original game. There is no shortage of ammo and batteries either, so no more desperate sprints towards a distant light source with snarling enemies snapping at your heels. Instead you can stand your ground and dispose of foes with weapons like shotguns, hunting rifles, machine guns, crossbows and even a nail gun. You can only carry two weapons at a time, plus a flare gun, flares and flash bang grenades, but there are plenty of ammo and refill stations dotted around. New weapon crates are unlocked by finding manuscript pages scattered about the landscape.

Combat still involves “burning” the shadows off ordinary townsfolk before disposing of them with your weapons, but this time there is a bit more variety. New enemies include a behemoth wielding a circular saw, grenadier that lobs projectiles at you from a distance, spiders and even a foe that splits into weaker halves when you shine your flashlight on it. The annoying black birds also make a return, but this time changes into a human when they combine. Every now and then you will also have vehicles flung at you, but the amount of memorable set pieces are definitely less. There is also a certain amount of repetition as you will be traversing the three locations multiple times. The ample checkpoints and over abundance of ammo definitely makes the game a lot easier than the first one, but there is a “nightmare” mode to kick things up a notch.

The PC version of the game is a quality port and thankfully did not take two years to arrive. The graphics and animations are very good and the locations are nicely detailed. The audio is also pretty good with some solid voice acting, barring a wooden sounding line or two. The music is of the usual high standard and they have even woven the Kasabian song, “Club foot” into the narrative. The radio shows are also back and this time features an interview with the “old gods” who should be familiar to fans of the first game. I missed the “episodic” feel that the original game had but it makes sense that it is not present for this stand-alone title.

Players unfamiliar with Alan Wake might have a tough time figuring out what is going on and even fans could have some trouble for the first 30 minutes or so. Things soon fall into place, however, and while the story isn’t terribly original it does provide players with a good reason to go blasting some “Taken.” Mr. Scratch also makes for a very interesting villain. Overall, the game does not take itself as seriously as the original with might appeal to some fans. I enjoyed playing the game, but it definitely felt like there was something missing. Hopefully it will not take too long for us to find out where Alan’s journey through the dark will take him next.

*Review originally published May 2012.

System Requirements

  • OS:Windows XP SP2
  • Processor:Dual Core 2GHz Intel or 2.8GHz AMD
  • Memory:2 GB RAM
  • Graphics:DirectX 10 compatible with 512MB RAM
  • DirectX®:10
  • Hard Drive:8 GB HD space
  • Sound:DirectX 9.0c compatible
  • OS:Windows 7
  • Processor:Quad Core 2.66GHz Intel or 3.2GHz AMD
  • Memory:4 GB RAM
  • Graphics:DirectX 10 compatible or later with 1GB RAM
  • DirectX®:10
  • Hard Drive:8 GB HD space
  • Sound:DirectX 9.0c compatible

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